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Updates on Courtney Love, ACLU-Amazon, and Taco Bell Lawsuits

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Image by Ramberg Media Images on Flickr

Image by Ramberg Media Images on Flickr

Legal news stories have a funny way of making headlines when they first happen and then quietly fading away — but here are three stories previously covered here with some noteworthy updates:

We first told you about this lawsuit in Courtney Love Sued Over Tweets. At that time, the case was set to go to trial based on fashion designer Dawn Simorangkir’s allegations that Love had defamed her via Twitter. Love maintained that her postings were mere opinions and not presented as fact, which would make them not defamatory by law.

This one never did get to see in the inside of a courtroom as reports say that a settlement deal has been reached. The amount is somewhere in the neighborhood of $430,000, with payments scheduled from now through 2014. That is one very expensive free Twitter account.

This story first appeared at LegalZoom as Amazon and ACLU Resist Release of Customer Information. The North Carolina Department of Revenue (NCDOR) had wanted Amazon to pay sales taxes to the state, and it argued that it needed certain purchase information to figure out what was due.

Recently, the NCDOR has “agreed to stop asking online retailers such as Amazon.com for information that could tie customers to specific purchases.” However, the “NCDOR claims that its position in the case has been misrepresented and that all the state wants are taxes owed by Amazon.com.” Read the full text of the NCDOR statement via the link above.

We first told you about this case in Taco Bell Has Beef with Lawsuit’s Claims, and now, not surprisingly, Taco Bell has moved to dismiss the lawsuit against it. The lawsuit against Taco Bell claims that the term “seasoned ground beef” or “seasoned beef” to describe the filling of many of its products constitutes false advertising; the fast food chain has been fighting the claims in the media from the get-go.

But now Taco Bell has taken legal action, claiming that “the complaint fails for two reasons: one, it has no facts to support the assertions made, and two, USDA regulations do not apply to restaurant menus.”

Stay tuned for any further updates!

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March 7th, 2011 at 3:13 am